Category Archives: native americans

News Coverage: NCAI Announces First Chief Executive Officer, Kevin Allis

News Coverage: NCAI Announces First Chief Executive Officer, Kevin Allies, NCAI.org, June 12, 2019.

NCAI Announces First Chief Executive Officer, Kevin Allis

WASHINGTON, D.C. | Today, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) is delighted to announce that Kevin Allis has accepted the role of its first Chief Executive Officer (CEO). In this role, Allis will be responsible for leading and managing all strategic and operational aspects of the  organization while creating a vision for the future long-term success for NCAI and the NCAI Fund. Allis will report directly to the NCAI Executive Committee.

Allis, a member of the Forest County Potawatomi Community, comes to NCAI with demonstrated leadership within the government relations industry where he spent time building strong working relationships with key congressional offices, relevant administrative agencies, and other advocacy organizations, to strategically advance top priorities for Indian Country. Kevin’s previous roles include Executive Director of the Native American Contractors Association, Board Chairman of the Potawatomi Business Development Corporation, and founder of Thunderbird Strategies, LLC, a government relations firm specializing in advocacy of Native American rights. Allis is also an attorney and former law enforcement officer who served the Baltimore Police Department for 8 years.

“NCAI, in its 75 years, has defined, defended, and continues to champion efforts to promote Native resiliency and tribal sovereignty. I am sincerely humbled by the honor to lead this organization, and appreciate the opportunity and challenge to continue the great work of this historic organization in strengthening tribal sovereignty and  safeguarding our traditions and customs for generations to come,” stated Allis.

The NCAI Executive Committee interviewed several well-qualified candidates for the CEO position. “As we embark on a new chapter with the hiring of our first CEO, we are pleased to welcome Kevin Allis to the National Congress of American Indians. We are fortunate to benefit from Kevin’s considerable expertise and look forward to working together to protect and advance tribal sovereignty,” said NCAI President, Jefferson Keel, of the Executive Committee’s selection of Mr. Allis. “We look forward to formally introducing our new CEO at NCAI’s Mid Year Conference and Marketplace, June 24-27 in Sparks, Nevada.”

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About The National Congress of American Indians:

Founded in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians is the oldest, largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization in the country. NCAI advocates on behalf of tribal governments and communities, promoting strong tribal-federal government-to-government policies, and promoting a better understanding among the general public regarding American Indian and Alaska Native governments, people and rights. For more information visit www.ncai.org.

Proposed Rulemaking on Qualified Opportunity Funds

Created by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (enacted December 2017), Opportunity Zones are economically distressed areas where investments in development projects can receive special tax breaks. Opportunity Funds use the investments to stimulate development in these areas.
Currently, investors can defer taxes on capital gains invested in these Funds when the investment is sold or exchanged by the Opportunity Fund or December 31, 2026 at the latest. If an investor has money in the Fund for more than five years, then 10% of the capital gains earned are excluded from calculating income and deferred taxes. If the investment is held for more than seven years, the percentage increases to 15%. After ten years, the fair market value at the time of sale or exchange determines the amount of any deferred taxes or exclusions.
Opportunity Funds may be corporations, LLCs, or partnerships making investment business structures flexible. It is unclear how the opportunity zone system will affect tribal areas because states nominate census areas for opportunity zone designation. There is potential for future regulations to include consultation with tribal governments for designating opportunity zones.
The IRS has released proposed regulations for implementing the new Opportunity Zone tax breaks. The open comment period will begin after official publication in the Federal Register and will last for sixty days. Additionally, the IRS is planning a tribal consultation to obtain additional input on the proposed rules, including guidance on trust land leases and other potential tribal concerns. IRS Pre Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

Tribal Transportation Funding Re-authorization Legislation

Legislators are hoping to make significant progress on the FAST Act (Transportation) re-authorization before the congressional recess in August, but it is unclear whether that progress will result in a bill markup by the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works or move closer to a floor vote.
On April 11, Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND) introduced the Addressing Underdeveloped and Tribally Operated Streets (AUTOS) Act. The Act, S.1211, aims to improve federal funding procedures for road safety and repairs in Indian Country. Joining Sen. Hoeven, the bill’s cosponsors are Sens. Martha McSally (R-AZ) and Kevin Cramer (R-ND). Senator. The bill has been referred to the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs that Senator Hoeven chairs.
Tribal transportation authorities currently receive a majority of funding under the Tribal Transportation Program (TTP), which is jointly managed by the BIA and Federal Highway Administration. TTP initially received $465M in fiscal year 2016 under the FAST Act, the current legislation for transportation funding. With the FAST Act set to authorize $505M for the next fiscal year and expire in September 2020, the AUTOS Act’s sponsors see an opportunity to streamline the federal funding process and to address the increasing maintenance backlog for roads, bridges, and safety features on tribal lands.
The Act’s main impact for tribal transportation budgets is the additional $16M in funding that it would add to any amount included in a FAST Act reauthorization for fiscal year 2021. This figure would increase by $2M each year with a total of $24M for the 2025 fiscal year. The BIA Road Maintenance Program would receive separate dedicated funding of $46M for the 2021 fiscal year and end with $54M for fiscal year 2025.
The AUTOS Act would allow the Secretary of Interior to create categorical exclusions from environmental review similar to those already established by the Department of Transportation. For safety projects that still require review, the Secretary or other supervising federal official will have to use the shortest timeline possible to report back to the Indian tribe proposing the project. Under the proposed bill, Tribes also can enter into agreements to conduct environmental reviews for TTP funded projects.
The AUTOS Act would also start a federal initiative to standardize crash reports for tribal road accidents and study road maintenance best practices. Read AUTOS Act

The Mueller Report: What was Mueller’s Conclusion?

As we all now well know a redacted version of the Mueller report has been released, and Barr, the Attorney General has offered to release another less redacted report to key Congressional leaders, but what does the Mueller report conclude? There seems from a range of sources that Mueller could be interpreted differently than the Attorney General initially reported. Robert Mueller seems to have had a basic concern for fairness. If a sitting President cannot be prosecuted under the policy of the Office of Legal Counsel of DOJ, then is it fair to conclude there is evidence to prosecute, if you cannot. Mueller decides it is not fair to pursue the evidence, without the opportunity of a trial, and leaves it to Congress while the President is in Office, or to prosecutors after he leaves office. NYTimes Article on Redacted Report

Mueller wrote that his evidence was not sufficient to clearly establish that the President had not committed a crime. The Attorney General, Barr insisted that it was not sufficient to establish that he had.  These conclusions are fundamentally at odds. A footnote in the Mueller report points out that a criminal investigation could ultimately result in charges being brought either after a president has been removed from office by the process of impeachment or after he has left office. Mueller seems to be rejecting the defense that a president could not be guilty of obstruction of justice for the conduct in question: “The protection of the criminal justice system from corrupt acts by any person-including the President-accords with the fundamental principle of our government that ‘[n]o [person] in this country is so high that he is above the law.”
Where does this leave the report? Will it be used as a document that sets up impeachment or exonerates the President? We will know more in coming weeks, when the battle lines are drawn, and more is revealed. At the moment, there is talk from Congressional Democratic leaders that the report reveals more than the Attorney General initially reported. But it is still unclear if the report will have a devastating impact on the President’s term in office or his campaign. It will probably depend on if the American people are tired of this topic, or want the apparent offenses of the President pursued.   It is likely each member of Congress is testing these waters in their Districts and listening to reactions of constituents to the report.  Read more

RES 2019 – Tribal 8(a) – Hemp legalization Opportunity Zones

 
We attended Res 2019 in Nevada, where they had a record attendance of Native Business and Tribal leaders.   The work sessions included the interest Tribes and tribal businesses are showing in the production Hemp as a crop and development of  Hemp  products since the legalization of Hemp in the Farm Act.  And, the conference provided sessions with detailed information on how to start up a tribal economic development division.    There were also interesting sessions on taking advantage of the Opportunity Zone Tax incentives, created by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, that offers new options for investment in economically distressed communities. Certain investors believe that the creation of Qualified Opportunity Zones will be significant.
Our firm is currently active in drafting Hemp production ordinances for clients and understanding the market for Hemp and Hemp products.  We also can help clients understand the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and the potential offered by Opportunity Zones.   And, many of those attending RES are part of or have started Tribal 8(a) corporations.   Our firm has experience in this area as well, and won a significant case for a Tribal 8(a) that had been terminated, by reversing the agencies  decision.  Please let us know if we can assist you with tribal 8(a) or individual 8(a) issues in some way.  We discovered at the conference that many Native 8(a) applications had been lost by SBA after the government shut down.  We would very much like to assist you, if you have similar 8(a) questions or concerns.
We offer consultation and legal services for tribal owned enterprises, contractors, and other businesses in Indian Country. We can assist you with the SBA 8(a) process, understanding federal program requirements, applying for government contracts, and legal issues that arise from venturing with non Native Corporations.
In addition we can help with:
  • Enacting a Tribal code for creating corporations and other business entities
  •  Choosing a structure that best serves your business needs
  • Obtaining Tribal 8(a) certification and status
  •  Forming a business under appropriate law
  • Seeking joint venture partners
  • Understanding government regulations and impact on business
  • Contacting the federal government procurement offices.

Washington Highlights – Tribal Interior Budget Council

This week the Tribal Interior Budget Council met here in D.C. at the Washington Plaza Hotel.  The focus was on the President’s budget and the elimination of several key Tribal programs (as we reported in our last update).   After the Government Shutdown and the compromise on the budget in January 2019, the Bureau of Indian Affairs in general did not fare as badly in comparison to some departments.  However, Indian Affairs still suffered losses that could have been avoided if the budget compromise had gone though as planned when the US Senate voted unanimously in September 2018 to keep the government open.  For example, Tribal road maintenance would have increased prior to the shut down by more than $4 million.  After the shutdown the increase was only $1 million.  The President’s proposed 2020 budget eliminates, Indian Guaranteed loans, Tribal Scholarships, and Housing (HIP) programs, and decreases funding for many other programs, such as the Indian Child Welfare Act, Mineral and Mining projects, public safety and education construction, and funds for small and needy tribes. see budget comparison
Tribal leaders focused on other priority issue at the conference, such as land into trust, the Bureau of Indian Education funding and programs, and Transportation and road maintenance funding.  The question is whether the Tribes have the clout to get Congress to ensure key Tribal programs and funding is protected and increased.

 

Bethany C. Sullivan & Jennifer L. Turner on Carcieri

I agree Enough is Enough …good article

Turtle Talk

Bethany C. Sullivan and Jennifer L. Turner have published “Enough Is Enough: Ten Years of Carcieri v. Salazar” in the Public Land & Resources Law Review. Here is the abstract:

Ten years ago, the United States Supreme Court issued its watershed decision in Carcieri v. Salazar, landing a gut punch to Indian country. Through that decision, the Supreme Court upended decades of Department of the Interior regulations, policy, and practice related to the eligibility of all federally recognized tribes for the restoration of tribal homelands through the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) of 1934. The Court held that tribes must demonstrate that they were “under federal jurisdiction” in 1934 to qualify for land into trust under the first definition of “Indian” in the IRA. Carcieri has impacted all tribes by upending the land-into-trust process and requiring tribes (and Interior) to spend scant resources to establish statutory authority for trust land acquisitions, a burdensome task that had previously been straight forward…

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New Secretary of Interior is Confirmed

 
 
On Thursday, the US Senate confirmed David Bernhardt as the new Secretary of the Interior.  The vote was largely along party lines 56 to 41, some Democrats pointed out the contradiction with Trump’s administration to “drain the swamp” of those insiders in Washington who take over key appointed positions for their own gain.  Bernhardt, is a former industry lobbyist for Oil and the Agribusiness, and now sits a top an agency that governs and regulates mineral rights and leases.  Bernhardt, who has played a major role in designing the President’s policies for expanding drilling and mining, will now serve over 500 million acres of public land and vast coastal waters. However, Secretary Bernhardt is also known for imposing more ethical standards at the Department of the Interior, after scandals during the Bush Administration.  And he certainly has experience with Department programs.  He served as the Deputy Secretary under Zinke and was Acting Secretary until his recent appointment this week. See New York Times Article

Medicare and Medicaid Funding in Jeopardy

USET and other organization are asking for help lobbying for tribal consultation on the changes to Medicare and Medicaid funding to Indian country.  The rules have changed that leave it to State’s to set work requirements for eligibility for Medicaid funding through the 1115 waiver process.  This could severely impact Indian Health service funding.  Therefore AI/AN Medicaid recipients must be made exempt from these barriers to accessing the health care to which they are entitled, and CMS has a duty to ensure that this occurs as a part of the waiver process. Medicaid currently represents 67% of 3rd party revenue at IHS, and 13% of overall IHS spending.   Tribal organization are advocating that any proposed changes to the administration of Medicaid must be preceded by comprehensive consultation with Tribal Nations. Currently, the 1115 waiver process requires that states engaged in Tribal Consultation prior to submission of 1115 Demonstrations to CMS. CMS must ensure Tribal consultation with Tribal Nations occurs at both the state and federal levels before state waiver applications can proceed.

See USET Letter

 

Fake News: It happens in Indian Country Too!

No doubt you have heard the news about the CEO and founder of Facebook, Mark Zuckerburg testifying on Capitol Hill, and explaining why he didn’t protect his Facebook subscribers from privacy breaches and those that promote false and fake news.  Well Indian Country is not exempt.  See Washington Post Article:

Well fake news happens about Indian Country too.  An article has been circulating on Facebook in recent weeks you may have seen published on May 5, with the headline, “In Victory for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Court Finds That Approval of Dakota Access Pipeline Violated the Law”.  That article was cut and pasted from an article a year ago.  A Vietnamese site claiming to be about Native American affairs has recycled the story to gin up clicks and advertising revenue. For some reason news about the Standing Rock reservation and Native American affairs in general have become a favorite niche of foreign-run Facebook pages and websites. If you see a news report about these topics pop up in your newsfeed, always check if you are looking at an original source before liking, sharing or commenting: it could be you are looking at old news being repackaged and fed back into your news stream by some guy in Macedonia or Kosovo wanting to make a few quick bucks.

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